Raequan Williams

IDL, Michigan State

  • Conf Big Ten - East
  • Jersey #99
  • Class RS Senior
  • HT 6'4"
  • DOB 02/14/1997
  • WT 304 lbs
ANALYST'S REPORTS

Crabbs

Marino

    Hand Technique - Does well to punch and extend himself, if he lands hands first he'll typically gather control of his blocks. He's got requisite NFL length to play stack and shed, although mobility isn't ideal and he's a bit stale trying to play off blocks. Like some of his savvy in rush counters as well.

    Competitive Toughness - Too many plays where he gives up his chest and is guilty of getting bubbled off the LOS for big gaps in the middle. He'll struggle to re-anchor and once momentum is established against him, it's hard to throw the e-brake and sit back down versus drive blocks.

    Two Gap Ability - He's not a true nose but if he's committed to making a pile, he can stack up centers and stuff up moving parts on the inside. He's not really in possession of ideal short area mobility to unlock his hips and disengage into adjacent gaps. A-gap reps ideally come in even front looks where he's not asked to play a true NT.

    Gap Penetration - Good backfield penetration and if he's allowed to work his helmet into gaps, he's got the ability to churn through and push through contact to the mesh point. Does well to locate the football when he's play side and able to uncover quickly. Capable of slipping first punches with finesse or stacking.

    Tackling - His finish is effective, he's got good quickness in linear pushes and has proven effective in wrap up blocks amid the pile. His lateral mobility and skill to slide into a gap late to get notable pieces of the ball carrier isn't a stand out trait and makes it difficult for him to finish when coming off of blocks.

    Flexibility - Does not showcase a great deal of mobility in the hips and waist to hinge and pivot and redirect himself gracefully. He shows some shoulder range of motion to duck punches but asking him to bend or fold around blocks while engaged in contact isn't a strength.

    Pass Rush Counters - Like his flash of the hands and subsequent counters. High swim/arm over move worked well for him. Converted into power rushes surprisingly well despite the lack of explosiveness in his frame, capable of walking back lighter blockers into the lap of the quarterback.

    First Step Explosiveness - He does have some useful quickness to get out of the blocks, he's not always consistent with release timing but when he's shooting into gaps he'll catch you off guard from time to time. Those reps are where he shines the brightest with pro potential as a rotational impact player.

    Feet/COD - He's more useful sliding out of a gap at the snap than he is working over the top of a block or disengaging late to uncover in the hole. If you ask him to work back across his frame, you'll experience some delay and ball carriers can slingshot past his orbit with quickness before he can react.

    Versatility - He has flashes of skill in both the A and the B gap. Think he's best suited in a penetration style defense to shoot gaps and if you keep him fresh, he can feasibly win and create some chaos. Wouldn't endorse throwing him outside or as an end and ask him to rush the passer, though. 

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    Best Trait - Versatility

    Worst Trait - Explosiveness

    Best Film - Michigan (2019)

    Worst Film - Ohio State (2019)

    Red Flags - None

    Summary - Raequan Williams projects as a viable depth defender along the defensive front. His athletic ceiling looms large as a barrier to him garnering significant snaps without some injuries to a team's defensive line group, but Williams' ability to line up in the A or B gap and provide modest results should offer roster value as a depth player. Some savvy navigation of the offensive backfield has produced splash plays but his play is intermittent and littered with poor anchoring at the POA. 

    Updated: 03/28/2020