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Malik Willis
NFL Draft

Seahawks Mock Draft 2022: Post-Russell Wilson Trade

  • Ryan Fowler
  • March 9, 2022
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With Russell Wilson now gone, there’s no point in sulking—time waits for no man. For Seattle, while the memories will remain of Wilson’s heroics, division titles, and dominant Super Bowl 47 victory, his trade to Denver has turned the Seahawks’ vision toward the future, beyond the horizon, and fortuitous forthcomings in the coming seasons.

With a hefty amount of fresh draft capital acquired from Denver, Seattle has a bevy of opportunities to add talent to a roster in need of such after losing their franchise cornerstones in Wilson and Bobby Wagner within a 12-hour period.

Using our Mock Draft Machine, I looked at which prospects Seattle could, and should, target when the draft rolls around. Here is my seven-round mock, including scheme fit, on each prospect:

ROUND 1 (NO. 9 OVERALL): MALIK WILLIS, QB, LIBERTY

The clear option for me at No. 9 overall, comparing the success Wilson had under Carroll to the potential ceiling of Malik Willis could represent a seamless fit. While he could come off the board as early as No. 6 to Carolina, if Willis were to slip to Seattle and I’m general manager John Schneider, there isn’t a talent in this class I’m willing to take a risk on in the top 10 OTHER than the elite dual-threat talent that is the Liberty product in Willis.

While general manager John Schneider should do everything in his power to keep both D.K. Metcalf and Tyler Lockett in town, pairing Willis’ playmaking ability and bazooka for an arm could see the offensive trio reap the rewards if all comes to fruition. Willis by no means presents a clean, refined talent under center, but if you’re looking for a potential replacement of Wilson with a similar skill set out of college, Willis is the poster child of the class.

ROUND 2 (NO. 40 OVERALL): BERNHARD RAIMANN, OT, CENTRAL MICHIGAN

With a vacancy at QB and your two starting tackles set to enter the open market, what better way to spend your first two picks on major areas of need? After grabbing a potential game-changer in Willis in the first, adding his blindside protectant in Bernhard Raimann could immediately add two decade-long starters at two premier spots.

An athletic specimen at 6-foot-7, Raimann has flown under the radar due to the decal on his helmet, but make no mistake about it, the former Chippewa can play ball with the best of them. With smooth feet, powerful hands, and the ability to work in space with agility and burst, he won’t be the sexiest pick from the public eye, but Seattle faithful will come to love the Austria-born mauler.

ROUND 2 (NO. 41 OVERALL): TARIQ WOOLEN, CB, UTSA

Similar to the tackle spot, the Seahawks are in desperate need of talent in their defensive secondary. Tariq Woolen, a once-in-every-decade type of athlete at 6-foot-4 with 4.2 speed, could immediately holster the load of CB1. Improved play up front is expected under newly minted defensive coordinator Clint Hurtt, which should allow ample opportunities for Woolen to use his length and playmaking ability to wreak havoc all over the ceiling of the defense.

 

 

ROUND 3 (NO. 72 OVERALL): DRAKE JACKSON, EDGE, USC

He has room to grow as a pass-rusher and will benefit from an NFL weight program, but his performance at the combine showcased a twitched-up athlete with the ability to do it all along the defensive front, and, if needed, in space as a cover man. One of the more gifted athletes on the edge, Drake Jackson’s lower half explosiveness will present him with many opportunities to create pressure from the onset of his career. He doesn’t present the perfect fit as a 4-3 DE, but Seattle needs youth-infused on the edge and Jackson provides that, and then some.

ROUND 4 (NO. 107 OVERALL): ALEC PIERCE, WR, CINCINNATI

If Tyler Lockett is traded, Willis or whoever aligns under center for Seattle is going to need someone to throw to opposite D.K. Metcalf. The 6-foot-3 presence in Alec Pierce could provide a heck of a 1-2 punch opposite the athletic marvel that is Seattle’s de facto WR1. A 50-50 ball extraordinaire whose sneaky athleticism allows him to consistently stack corners and break off routes at a moment’s notice, in a deep wideout class, adding the uber-productive Pierce here on day three could be considered a steal.

ROUND 5 (NO. 151 OVERALL): CAM JURGENS, IOL, NEBRASKA

Both Ethan Pocic and Kyle Fuller are free agents, warranting an add within the interior five. Cam Jurgens is a fleet-footed center whose athleticism stands out on film. For as high as teams have Iowa’s Tyler Linderbaum ranked, grabbing a similarly-built lineman with likewise traits as a center could produce a hefty amount of value in the fifth round.

ROUND 5 (NO. 152 OVERALL): BRYAN COOK, S, CINCINNATI

Back to the Cincinnati well here with Bryan Cook. While I pondered selecting Miami (OH) safety Sterling Weatherford here, at 6-foot-4 opposite Jamal Adams, I don’t like the fit. With Quandre Diggs (5-foot-9) set to explore free agency, a smaller man in Cook (6-foot-1) with split-zone ability and a downhill, violent temperament should slot in well in Seattle. One of the more impressive safeties in the class near the LOS—he needs work in processing offensive concepts—with the necessary allotment of snaps, he should progress into a nice piece on the backend.

ROUND 7 (NO. 226 OVERALL): NEIL FARRELL JR., IDL, LSU

With so many positions of need, I wish the board fell in my favor earlier in the draft to add a premier interior pusher, but grabbing Neil Farrell Jr. here as a rotational 4-3 defensive tackle should make Seahawks faithful happy if it were to come to reality. Fresh legs are needed up front, and although Farrell Jr. could see his most immediate snaps come as a third-down DPR (designated pass rusher) from the interior, his quickness could see him challenge for a three-down role moving toward the future.

Written By

Ryan Fowler