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Chris Olave Packers
Green Bay Packers

Packers Mock Draft 2022: Post-Davante Adams Trade

  • Jack McKessy
  • March 21, 2022
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With the shocking trade that sent wide receiver Davante Adams to the Las Vegas Raiders, the Green Bay Packers—who already were stocked up on draft picks—gained even more draft capital. Las Vegas sent over a first- and second-round pick, so the Packers now have half of their 10 picks in the top 100.

Though they’ve got Aaron Rodgers sticking around, the loss of Adams makes pass-catchers an even bigger priority in this draft. They’ve also got some holes to fill on the defense, specifically at linebacker, edge rusher, and interior defensive line.

Provided they don’t trade some of their draft picks for veteran players, they’ll have a lot of chances to not only fill holes but add depth elsewhere as well. I took a crack at doing just that, taking over Brian Gutekunst’s job in my seven-round Packers mock draft.

ROUND 1 (NO. 22 OVERALL): CHRIS OLAVE, WR, OHIO STATE

Remember how I said pass-catcher was a big need? Green Bay can make their quarterback a much happier man by taking a receiver with their first pick. That’s why they use the pick they got from Las Vegas here to bring in one of the top wide receivers in this draft class.

Chris Olave is a very dynamic receiver with huge potential to create big plays. He consistently creates separation at the top of his routes with high-level burst and agility as well as elite route-running. His ability to stretch the field and make big plays with his speed and explosiveness would make him a great pair with Rodgers as the quarterback’s new No. 1 receiver.

ROUND 1 (NO. 28 OVERALL): GEORGE KARLAFTIS, EDGE, PURDUE

After addressing the receiver position with their extra first-round pick, Green Bay fills their need at edge rusher with the best option available overall: George Karlaftis.

Though he has all but fallen out of the top-three EDGE conversation in recent months, Karlaftis is an excellent power rusher that complements his strength with speed to win with some consistency. He’s not as lengthy as some other edge rushers in this draft class, but the power he can generate with what length he has mitigates a lot of that disadvantage.

Karlaftis is explosive, powerless, and plays with a ton of effort. Altogether, that makes him a very effective addition to a needy Green Bay pass rush.

ROUND 2 (NO. 53 OVERALL): CHAD MUMA, LB, WYOMING

Now that De’Vondre Campbell is back in Green Bay, getting an upgrade at linebacker to play alongside him would make the Packers’ front seven even more formidable.

Chad Muma is a converted safety, which naturally makes him a strong defender in pass coverage, but he’s a solid run defender as well. He’s a physical player in the box and a very good tackler that rarely misses tackles in the box or the open field. Muma’s physicality and comfort in tight spaces have allowed him to play down on the line of scrimmage a bit as well.

ROUND 2 (NO. 59 OVERALL): TRAVIS JONES, IDL, UCONN

Green Bay’s already got a centerpiece on their defensive line with nose tackle Kenny Clark, but their roster is slim at the rest of the positions on the D-line.

With Tyler Lancaster hitting free agency, Travis Jones gives the Packers immediate additional depth at nose tackle behind Clark. He’s primarily an A-gap run defender and isn’t as strong a defender in pass-rush situations, but he still was able to produce some pressure in college with his outstanding power. The strong, powerful big man also has a great work ethic and puts plenty of effort into every play.

ROUND 3 (NO. 92 OVERALL): TREY MCBRIDE, TE, COLORADO STATE

The Packers already locked up a wide receiver in the first round, so now they add an excellent pass-catching tight end in Colorado State standout Trey McBride.

He can align anywhere you ask him—Y, F, H, or FB—plays on special teams and is a fantastic pass-catcher. Because of the tight end’s versatility and elite ball skills, Colorado State’s offense ran through McBride. For an offense that needs as many weapons as they can get for Rodgers, the tight end would add an instinctive pass-catcher with plenty of big-play potential to Green Bay’s passing game.

ROUND 4 (NO. 132 OVERALL): TYRESE ROBINSON, IOL, OKLAHOMA

Green Bay cut ties with one tackle in the versatile Billy Turner, and while David Bakhtiari is projected to return this year from an ACL tear, the Packers could still use depth on the O-line. Oklahoma’s Tyrese Robinson, though he projects as a guard at the NFL level, is a versatile player that can play tackle if needed.

Robinson is an incredibly tough player and his bully mentality allows him to win often at the point of attack, especially from the guard position. It’s that mentality and his versatility that makes him a strong addition to the offensive front tasked with keeping Rodgers protected for at least another year.

ROUND 4 (NO. 140 OVERALL): DOHNOVAN WEST, IOL, ARIZONA STATE

With all of the Packers’ biggest needs addressed with their first six picks, they can turn their attention to adding more depth in the back half of this draft.

Dohnovan West adds even more O-line depth after Green Bay took Robinson less than 10 picks earlier. He’s another versatile player that adds roster help at all three interior positions, having played center and both guard spots during his time at Arizona State. West is an overall solid athlete that is strong in both pass protection and run blocking, playing with good hand technique and a strong anchor.

ROUND 5 (NO. 171 OVERALL): JUSTYN ROSS, WR, CLEMSON

Yes, another offensive weapon. I might start sounding like a broken record here, but pass-catchers were a need even before Adams left for Las Vegas. Doubling up on receiver help in later rounds can never hurt for a team as weapon-needy as the Packers are.

Justyn Ross can play outside and in the slot, though he excels most on the inside with his quickness on shorter routes and ability to secure contested catches. He isn’t the speediest receiver, but he can make big plays happen with his strong frame and agility providing good run after catch potential.

ROUND 7 (NO. 228 OVERALL): JOSH THOMPSON, CB, TEXAS

Re-signing cornerback Rasul Douglas almost completely removes cornerback as a position of need. But with Jaire Alexander missing much of the 2021 season with injury and playing on his fifth-year option in 2022, it wouldn’t hurt to have more depth in the defensive secondary this year and potentially beyond.

Josh Thompson adds depth not only at cornerback but at safety too. He’s a solid athlete whose best traits are his tackling and competitiveness. He has the tendency to play it safe in pass coverage by keeping receivers in front of him, but he can occasionally be overzealous trying to jump a route and get burned. That said, Thompson is definitely worth a pick this late in the draft.

ROUND 7 (NO. 249 OVERALL): ISAIAH POLA-MAO, SAF, USC

Depth, depth, depth. That’s the name of the game here in round 7. The Packers have only Darnell Savage on the roster at free safety, and their third and fourth options—Vernon Scott and Shawn Davis—didn’t inspire confidence when they saw the field.

Isaiah Pola-Mao didn’t have his best season of ball production in 2021, but he’s still a versatile defender who can both drop down in the slot in man coverage and play zone with his good range over the middle of the field. He’s also an aggressive run defender and adds some additional value on special teams. Given how bad Green Bay’s special teams were last year, that’s an important trait for a safety addition, especially one this late in the draft, to have.