Building The Prototype: 2019 1000 Yard Receivers

Photo: Reinhold Matay-USA TODAY Sports

As the 2018 season unfolded, 17 wide receivers accumulated 1,000 receiving yards. In an effort to look into the typical prospect that eventually produces a 1,000 yard season, I looked back at each receiver’s time before their ascension into the NFL.

Among the 17 wide receivers, I looked at their height, weights, 40 yard dash time and vertical jump. In my opinion when examining the wide receiver position, these are the best indicators of athletic testing.

Here are the 17 wide receivers and their accompanying measureables:

Julio Jones: 6’3 220, 4.34 seconds, 38.5 inches

Deandre Hopkins: 6’1 212, 4.57 seconds, 36 inches

Mike Evans: 6’4 ¾ 231, 4.53 seconds, 37 inches

Tyreek Hill: 5’10 185, 4.29 seconds, 40.5 inches

JuJu Smith-Schuster: 6’1 215, 4.54 seconds, 32.5 inches

Michael Thomas: 6’3 212, 4.57 seconds, 35 inches

Davante Adams: 6’1 212, 4.56 seconds, 39.5 inches

Adam Thielen: 6’1 ⅛ 192, 4.49 seconds, 36 inches

Antonio Brown: 5’10 186, 4.56 seconds, 33.5 inches

T.Y. Hilton: 5’10 183, 4.34 seconds, 35.5 inches

Robert Woods: 6’0 201, 4.51 seconds, 33.5 inches

Brandin Cooks: 5’9 ¾ 189, 4.33 seconds, 36 inches

Keenan Allen: 6’2 ½ 206

Kenny Golladay: 6’4 218, 4.5 seconds, 35.5 inches

Odell Beckham Jr.: 5’11 ¾ 198, 4.43 seconds, 38.5 inches

Tyler Boyd: 6’1 197, 4.58 seconds, 34 inches

Stefon Diggs: 6’0 195, 4.46 seconds, 35 inches

Averages:

Height: The average height of all of these wide receivers was 6 feet, 0.8 inches tall (or roughly 6’0 ¾).

Weight: The average weight for each receiver was 203 pounds. For those wide receivers over 6’0 tall, the average weight was 207 pounds. For those wide receivers under 6’0 under, the average weight was 188 pounds.

40 yard dash: The average 40 yard dash time for all of the wide receiver was 4.48s. For those wide receivers over 6’0 tall, the average 40 yard dash was 4.51s. For those wide receivers under 6’0 tall, the average 40 yard dash was 4.39s (with only Antonio Brown running slower than a 4.43s).

Vertical: The average vertical jump for all wide receivers was 36.0 inches. For those wide receivers over 6’0 tall, the average vertical jump was rough 35 ¾ inches. For those wide receiver under 6’0 tall, the average vertical jump was rough 36 ¾ inches.

Note: Keenan Allen was omitted. Coming back from a foot injury, he ran slower than anticipated at the Combine, and didn’t participate in the vertical jump. Rather than alter the statistics with an uneven number, I omitted his measurables from the averages.

Recap:

The average measurables for a prospect that eventually reaches 1,000 receiving yards in a season looks like this:

Over 6’0 tall - 207 pounds, 4.51s, 35 ¾

Under 6’0 tall - 188 pounds, 4.39s, 36 ¾

When looking ahead to the 2019 NFL Draft, these averages will be useful to projecting which players could become 1,000 yard receivers at the next level. While there will always be outliers to every rule, these serve as a solid baseline for wide receiver prospects entering the league.

Written By:

Brad Kelly

NFL Draft Analyst

NFL Draft Analyst for The Draft Network. Wide Receivers Coach at Salve Regina University. Salve Regina Football ‘15.

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