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The Oakland Raiders apparently have quite a wish list if they plan on trading their defensive cornerstone, Khalil Mack. The buzz surrounding Mack involves two 1st-round picks being the asking price.

Is Mack worth it? That’s debatable, although I personally would be willing to part with two picks for his services. Make no mistake: Mack is a stud. But what kind of historical context is there for an established player being flipped for that kind of value?

Here are the established player for pick trades since 2000 involving first round selections.*

*NOTE: Trades involving 1st-round picks being swapped by both teams were not included

2000 – Two Wide Receiver Swaps

Tampa Bay receives: WR Keyshawn Johnson

New York (Jets) receives: Two 2000 1st-round picks (13th overall and 27th overall)

Keyshawn would go on to play four years with the Bucs, highlighted by a 106 catch, 1266 yard season in 2001 (although he only brought in one touchdown that season). Oh yeah, and he won a Lombardi Trophy.

The Jets would go on to pick four times in the 1st-round of 2000, landing DE Shaun Ellis, DE John Abraham, QB Chad Pennington and TE Anthony Becht. Abraham and Becht were the Bucs’ picks.

Dallas receives: WR Joey Galloway

Seattle receives: 2000 1st (19th overall) and 2001 1st (7th overall)

Galloway never logged more than 61 catches in any season with Dallas and topped 700 yards just once in four years. Galloway would go on to log three consecutive 1,000 yard seasons with Tampa Bay after departing the Cowboys.

Seattle would land RB Shaun Alexander with the 19th pick and, after a year-long wait, would trade back two spots to No. 9 and pick WR Koren Robinson (whoops) after LaDainian Tomlinson and Richard Seymour came off the board with the two picks prior to the 7th spot.


2001 – The Rams Were Busy

Kansas City receives: QB Trent Green

St. Louis receives: 2001 1st (12th overall) and 2001 5th (150th overall)

Green would commandeer two winning seasons in five tries as the starter in Kansas City, although he led the league in interceptions his first year with the team.

The Rams failed to make this pick count, drafting DT Damione Lewis with the 12th overall pick.

Tennessee receive: DE Kevin Carter

St. Louis receives: 2001 1st (29th overall)

Carter wasn’t the same defensive force as he was in St. Louis, logging double digit sacks just once in four seasons in Tennessee.

The Rams also failed to make this pick count, drafting DE Ryan Pickett at 29. The three picks immediately afterwards? WR Reggie Wayne, TE Todd Heap and QB Drew Brees. Whoops.


2002 – The Big Whoops

Miami receives: RB Ricky Williams and 2002 4th-round pick

New Orleans receives: 2002 1st (25th overall) and 2003 1st (18th overall)

Speaking of whoops, the Dolphins made Williams a workhorse back and ran him so hard into the ground he opted to retire. 779 carries in two years will do that to a guy (although Williams would rush for over 3200 yards and account for 29 touchdowns in those two years). Williams ultimately returned and six years after his 1st retirement rushed for 1100 yards and 11 touchdowns as a 32-year old back in Miami.

New Orleans would spend their draft capital to pick DE Charles Grant and help trade up to No. 6 overall in 2003 for DT Johnathan Sullivan.


2003 – Insider Trading

Buffalo receives: QB Drew Bledsoe

New England receives: 2003 1st (14th overall)

Bledsoe spent three years in Buffalo and failed to eclipse 3,000 yards passing in his final two seasons as a starter. His record as the starter was 23-25 and he went 1-5 against the Patriots, losing all five by more than one score.

The Patriots traded up one spot for DT Ty Warren with the pick they got back for Bledsoe.


2005 – You Got Moss’d

Oakland receives: WR Randy Moss

Minnesota receives: 2005 1st (7th overall) and 2005 7th (219 overall)

Moss would infamously quit on the Raiders, forcing his way out with a trade to New England. There he would more than double his touchdown production (23 touchdowns in 2007) from two seasons in Oakland (11).

The Raiders would trade out of this spot and dodge a very Raiders-esque bullet. The Vikings drafted WR Troy Williamson in that spot.


2006 – The AFC East Rush Continues

Atlanta receives: DE John Abraham

New York (Jets) receives: 2006 1st (29th overall)

Abraham would go on to log 68.5 sacks in seven seasons with the Falcons before ending his career with the Cardinals in 2014.

The Jets landed offensive line cornerstone C Nick Mangold with the 29th pick in 2006.

Seattle receives: WR Deion Branch

New England receives: 2007 1st (24th overall)

Branch would spend 4.5 seasons in Seattle, never eclipsing 53 catches or four touchdowns. He was traded to…you guessed it, New England, mid-season and logged 48 catches for 701 yards and five touchdowns in 11 games with New England the rest of the way.

The Patriots drafted a starting safety, Brandon Meriweather from Miami, in the 2007 class.


2008 – Minnesota Pays The Farm

Minnesota receives: DE Jared Allen and 2008 6th (187 overall) 

Kansas City receives: 2008 1st (17th overall), 2008 3rd (73rd overall), 2008 4th (82nd overall) and 2008 6th (182 overall)

Allen would total 85.5 sacks in six seasons with the Vikings, never failing to eclipse double-digits and had one 22-sack monster season in 2011.

Kansas City would trade up two spots and land OT Branden Albert (10 years as a starting OT in the NFL) and also land RB Jamaal Charles with the 73rd overall pick that year.

Dallas receives: WR Roy Williams

Detroit receives: 2009 1st (20th overall) and 2009 3rd (82nd overall)

Roy Williams would receive a $54 million dollar extension but never hit 40 receptions or 600 receiving yards in 3.5 seasons in Dallas before flaming out of the league.

Detroit would pair 1st overall pick Matt Stafford with TE Brandon Pettigrew courtesy of Dallas’ pick. Pettigrew had 5 productive seasons in Detroit before fizzling in his final two.


2009 – Offensive Cornerstones Find New Homes

Philadelphia receives: OT Jason Peters

Buffalo receives: 2009 1st (28th overall) and 2009 5th (121 overall)

Peters has gone on to start at left tackle for the last 8 years for Philadelphia and has twice been named 1st team All-Pro as a member of the Eagles’ team.

Buffalo would use the 28th pick in 2009 to pick Louisville center Eric Wood, who retired this offseason after being a long term starter for the Bills.

Chicago receives: QB Jay Cutler and 2009 5th (140 overall)

Denver receives: QB Kyle Orton, 2009 1st (18th overall), 2009 3rd (84th overall) and 2010 1st (11th overall)

Cutler would be rewarded a long term contract in 2014, but he ultimately finished his career in Chicago at 51-51 as a starter. The Bears would have three winning seasons under Cutler, but none in his final four seasons with the team.

The Broncos whiffed on their first pick from the deal, drafting DE Robert Ayers from Tennessee. Ayers logged 12 sacks in five years with the Broncos before walking and breaking out for 14 sacks in two seasons in New York.

The 11th overall pick in 2010 yielded several gains in assets. The Broncos would trade back from 11 to 13 with San Francisco and then trade back again with the Eagles to 24. The Broncos would then trade up from 24 to 22 and draft WR Demaryius Thomas.


2011 – The Raiders Overpay

Oakland receives: QB Carson Palmer

Cincinnati receives: 2012 1st (17th overall) and 2013 2nd (37th overall)

Palmer would play parts of two seasons in Oakland, going 8-16 as a starter and struggling with turnovers before being pushed to Arizona for the twilight of his career.

Cincinnati would draft Alabama CB Dre Kirkpatrick with the 17th pick in 2012, who has slowly developed into a starter on the Bengals defense after starting just 5 games in his first three seasons.


2013 – Boundary Playmakers Get Flipped

Tampa Bay receives: CB Darrelle Revis

New York (Jets) receives: 2013 1st (13 overall) and 2014 4th (104 overall)

Revis would play just one season in Tampa before bolting for New England in pursuit of a ring. Revis’ end-of-career habits would be marked as a mercenary, looking for the next big contract and playing through short term contracts.

The Jets would capitalize and land a potent interior pass rusher in Sheldon Richardson, who left New York in 2017 to play in Seattle before hitting free agency this offseason and landing on a 1-year contract with the Minnesota Vikings. Richardson had 16.5 sacks in his first three years with the Jets.

Seattle receives: WR Percy Harvin 

Minnesota receives: 2013 1st (25th overall), 2013 7th (214 overall) and 2014 3rd

Harvin would proceed to play just six games for Seattle and scored just one offensive touchdown. Harvin’s career was derailed by severe migraines.

The Vikings landed one of the best cornerbacks in football today, Florida State’s Xavier Rhodes, as return for Harvin’s six games in Seattle.

Indianapolis receives: RB Trent Richardson

Cleveland receives: 2014 1st (26th overall)

Richardson would play 29 games for the Colts, rushing for 977 yards and averaging 3.1 yards per carry. Richardson would score 7 touchdowns and average 4.0 yards per touch from scrimmage before flaming out of the NFL.

Cleveland would (fittingly, given their recent history), squander the pick. The Browns traded up several spots with Philadelphia, drafting former Heisman Trophy winning QB Johnny Manziel, who was out of the league shortly after Richardson.


2015 – Adios, Jimmy

Seattle receives: TE Jimmy Graham and 2015 4th (112 overall)

New Orleans receives: C Max Unger and 2015 1st (31st overall)

Graham would find his footing slowly in Seattle, but registered 1443 receiving yards and 16 touchdowns in his final two seasons with the Seahawks. Graham left Seattle this offseason and signed with the Green Bay Packers.

New Orleans has featured Unger as their starting center of 47 of 48 games since the trade, but used their acquired draft selection on former Clemson LB Stephone Anthony, who was traded to the Dolphins for a 5th-round pick in the 2018 NFL Draft.


2016 – Bradford Gets The Boot

Minnesota receives: QB Sam Bradford

Philadelphia receives: 2017 1st (14 overall) and 2018 conditional 4th

Bradford would start 17 games in two seasons for the Vikings, completing 72 percent of his passes but only mustering a 9-8 record with the team. Bradford would miss almost the entire 2017 season and the Vikings would go on to sign Kirk Cousins to a monster deal to replace Bradford as the starter this off-season.

The Eagles would use their acquired draft pick on Tennessee DE Derek Barnett, who will look to prove himself in his second season with the team after being a rotational pass rusher on the Eagles’ 2017 Super Bowl winning team.


2017 – Now We’re Cookin’

New England receives: WR Brandin Cooks and 2017 4th (118 overall)

New Orleans receives: 2017 1st (32nd overall) and 2017 3rd (107 overall)

Cooks was not a disappointment in New England, logging the third consecutive 1,000 yard receiving season of his career. Cooks averaged over 16.5 yards per catch and scored 7 touchdowns for the Patriots in 2017…before being traded away by Bill Belichick a year later.

The Saints drafted their starting right tackle, Wisconsin’s Ryan Ramczyk, with the 32nd pick of the 2017 NFL Draft.


2018 – Now We’re Cookin’ 2.0

Los Angeles (Rams) receives: WR Brandin Cooks and 2018 4th (136 overall)

New England receives: 2018 1st (23rd overall) and 2018 6th (198 overall)

In typical Belichick fashion, the Patriots flipped Cooks for a higher pick than the one they paid for him. Cooks will be the featured receiver on the Los Angeles Rams’ offense this season and will look to log a 4th straight 1,000 yard season.

New England used the Rams’ pick to draft OT Isaiah Wynn out of Georgia, who tore his achilles tendon in the preseason and will miss his entire rookie year.


Of all the trades for established players, only four of the 20 involved multiple first round picks. Three of those deals took place prior to 2003 and none more recently than Jay Cutler’s flip to Chicago on 2009.

So, in short, it’s been a while. Pulling the trigger on Mack is further compounded by the need to extend him on a long term contract. Mack, who is due for just short of $14 million in 2018, is in the 5th-year option of his rookie deal. He’ll want the contract resolved before he steps onto the field.

The closest precedent we have for a Mack trade is the Cutler deal, although Chicago had a several year buffer before having to extend Jay.

The trade, which took place in 2009, was followed by a 7-year, $126 million dollar extension in the winter of 2014. Mack will also seek a triple digit deal, although his valuation will require more guaranteed money and in less years.

As a football player, Mack has been a stalwart cornerstone since the Raiders landed his services in 2014. Mack has played in over 900 snaps in every season and has logged double digit sacks in his last three seasons with the Raiders.

Selfishly, football fans should hope the man gets his value sooner rather than later, as Mack is too good a player to be left off the field in a dollar dispute.

Who wants to pony up and make some history?