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NAME: Shea Patterson

SCHOOL: Michigan

CONFERENCE: Big10

POSITION: Quarterback

CLASS: Junior

JERSEY: No. 2

RECRUITMENT RATING: 5-star

HT: 6-1

WT: 193 lbs

D.O.B.: 1/17/1997


PROS: Shea Patterson as a highly productive passer in 7 game stint as starter in 2017, leading SEC in passing before injury. Has logged 300+ passing yards in 7 of 9 full games played at the collegiate level entering the 2018 season. Has an impressive arm, capable of pushing the ball with confidence and pace down the field. Likes to take big shots and at times will create chunk gains out of limited opportunities off initial look at the top of his platform. Has wonderful escapability, can leak the pocket from an inside gap by climbing the pocket or by flushing out the side to find clear space. Has been a potent passer off zone read concepts, capable of pulling the ball quickly and confidently gashing the defense with a route breaking into the middle of the field. Has a lot of natural arm ability, live arm can explode on film with high difficulty throws and ability to adjust arm slot to provide optimal throwing fluidity. Quick release when pulling the trigger, can get the ball out late to allow for separation.

CONS: Assimilation to a new offensive system and new teammates will be a notable question entering 2018 college season. Patterson missed the back half of the 2017 college season with a PCL tear in his knee, suffered against LSU. Needs to rein in tendencies as a play-extender, took a whole lot of big shots and was beaten up before succumbing to injury mid-way through the year. Also does not have a notably built frame, listed at 6-2 and 203 lbs, so durability is going to be a key concern for the talented passer. Will face a key test this season in ability to play within the structure of the offense, was able to create a lot of big plays by working wildly from the pocket. Will need to eliminate reps of giving up excessive ground as a passer in the backfield, has backtracked upwards of 15 yards trying to evade rushers. Needs to vary speed of the ball more frequently, will throw hot in short areas and compromise the catchability of the football.

– Kyle Crabbs